Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

Peaceful Resistance

Demonstrators Form Human Peace Sign While Blocking Traffic During Demonstration Against US Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan
Philadelphia
2003
Jim MacMillan

Demonstrators hold hands to form a peace symbol at Broad and Cherry Streets. Several groups including about 1,000 high school and college student peace protesters had marched through Center City against the impeding US invasion of Iraq, which came a few weeks later.

I found my way into a nearby parking garage to get the high perspective necessary to get this picture. I think a lot of local news photographers compile a mental inventory of easily accessible places where we can get high shots. I know I did.

Digital camera metadata: Date: 3/5/03, Time: 3:48:35 PM, Shutter: 1/640, f:4.0, ISO: 500, Lens: 80, Philadelphia, PA,US

It was unusual that my ISO was set to 500. I usually jumped from 400 to 800 to 1,600, replicating the same steps I knew from shooting common films for decades before. The lens was probably my 80-200 Nikon zoom.

Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

Vigil for Migrants

Demonstrators Hold Vigil in Memory of Migrants Who Lost Their Lives Trying to Cross Southern Border into United States
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2003
Jim MacMillan

Hundreds of protesters rallied on the steps at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  A smaller group then marched to City Hall for more songs and speeches.

Digital camera metadata: Date: 3/23/03, Time: 4:16:49 p.m., Shutter: 1/1250, f:4.0, ISO: 400, Lens: 17, Philadelphia, PA, US

Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

Not In Our Name

Demonstrators Block Traffic During Anti-war Demonstration Shortly Before US Invasion of Iraq
North Broad Street
Center City
2003
Jim MacMillan

I don’t remember a lot about this protest except for the location and thinking that most of the participants were probably high school students due to the mid-afternoon hour. Confrontations with drivers were also unusual because police would ordinarily cut off traffic at a nearby intersection and I don’t know why this day was different but it added more energy.

Visit the exhibition:

Portraits of Philadelphia: Photographs by Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, 1981-2023

Through March 31, 2024 | More info

Charles Library at Temple University
1st Floor Exhibit Space
1900 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Hours | Map | Parking and Transportation

Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

No Toy Guns

Demonstration March to Stop Gun Violence
Center City
2003
Jim MacMillan

Children march up Broad Street to kick off a toy gun collection campaign, in an effort to curb youth violence with real guns.

Digital image metadata: Date: 8/12/03, Time: 11:53:20 a.m., Shutter: 1/2000, f:5.6, ISO:800, Lens:17, Philadelphia, PA

It doesn’t make sense that I was shooting at ISO 800 in a scenario bright enough for these other settings but I often set the ISO on the cameras in my trunk at the start of the day and hopped out of my car to shoot things like this with very little notice. I mostly shot aperture-priority auto exposure and kept my eye on the shutter speed to make sure it was high enough to keep things sharp. ISO was just one too many things to think about on the fly.

I think I had a 17-24 zoom, or something like that because I often had to shoot very wide because digital cameras had much smaller chips at that time.

Visit the exhibition:

Portraits of Philadelphia: Photographs by Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, 1981-2023

Through March 31, 2024 | More info

Charles Library at Temple University
1st Floor Exhibit Space
1900 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Hours | Map | Parking and Transportation

Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

Bunch of Clowns

Protesters Critical of Mainstream Media Wear Colorful Costumes to Hijack News Coverage During Republican National Convention
Center City
2000
Jim MacMillan

I am pretty sure I captured this scene on Chestnut Street near South Broad Street on the eve of the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia in 2000. I rememeber that it was really hot out. I was still shooting film at that point and was probably using a Nikon F5.

These protesters were dressed up as clowns in an exercise intended to demonstrate that they could easily hijack media coverage simply by looking ridiculous. I never understood if they were suggesting that theatrics could take attention from more serious demonstrations or from the convention itself but I got this picture published with a caption addressing their tactics which would seem to diminish either motive.

Visit the exhibition:

Portraits of Philadelphia: Photographs by Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, 1981-2023

Through March 31, 2024 | More info

Charles Library at Temple University
1st Floor Exhibit Space
1900 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Hours | Map | Parking and Transportation

Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

Mutant Tomato

Protesters Against Genetically Modified Foods Stage Die-In
National Constitution Center
Circa 2005
Jim MacMillan

My favorite thing about my Philadelphia demonstration photos throughout the years is the spectrum of protest topics. The file metadata indicates that this photo was taken at 6:54 p.m. on June 19, 2005 and the caption field reads:

A “biodemocracy” protester, dressed as a mutant tomato, dances around a die-in demonstration in front of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia Sunday, June 19, 2005. Demonstrators have planned events this week, including a “day of action” on Tuesday, all to coincide with the Biotechnology Industry Organization annual international convention in downtown Philadelphia.

From the exhibition:

Portraits of Philadelphia: Photographs by Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, 1981-2023

On exhibit through March 31, 2024 | more info
Talk and reception: December 8, 2023 | free tickets

Update

Sarah Glover, Vice President for News and Civic Dialogue at WHYY, will moderate the panel discussion. She is also a former staff photojournalist at the Philadelphia Daily News and Inquirer.

Partner

I am honored to share this exhibition with Joseph V. Labolito. Visit: labolito.com

About the exhibition

In this exhibit, we explore the images of two photographers, Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, as they traveled around Philadelphia. Both captured unique human experiences, whether it was Labolito documenting neighborhood life or MacMillan following protestors marching through the streets. The contrast of the two photographers’ work as they moved about the city can be clearly seen in their photographs. While Labolito’s photographs in black and white are purposefully framed and occasionally posed, MacMillan’s color photographs were captured quickly and candidly in a way only a news photographer can. Both were trying to capture a fleeting moment in the city.

By creating a mixed gallery of their work, the viewer is surrounded by the city through their eyes. Combining images from these two collections, both recently donated to the Special Collections Research Center, we aim to demonstrate how everyone has a different perspective of the city they live in, and how two completely opposite experiences could happen right around the corner from one another. The viewer moves through the exhibit as an experience, surrounded by images of the city they may or may not remember, as the city is ever evolving.

Exhibit production by Brenda Galloway-Wright and Ann Mosher, Special Collections Research Center

Location

Charles Library at Temple University
1st Floor Exhibit Space
1900 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Hours | Parking and Transportation

About me

My usual home page will return after the exhibition but until then I will post any new photos here: Course of Life

Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

Patient Protester

Demonstrator Holds Sign While Awaiting Visit by US Attorney General John Ashcroft
National Constitution Center
Circa 2003
Jim MacMillan

This picture seems to be getting the most reaction from people I know who have seen the exhibition so far. It was taken was around the time when Ashcroft was advancing the Domestic Security Enhancement Act of 2003, sometimes called Patriot II, after the 2001 Patriot Act. I don’t remember exactly why he was visiting on this day.

I drove past the event to check for protesters and I didn’t think this was much of a picture — so, I didn’t even stop to get her name or story — but a print resurfaced while I was preparing this collection and I decided to include it. Calling someone a fascist was more unusual back then and I like how the sign juxtaposes with her outfit.

From the exhibition:

Portraits of Philadelphia: Photographs by Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, 1981-2023

On exhibit through March 31, 2024 | more info
Talk and reception: December 8, 2023 | free tickets

Update

Sarah Glover, Vice President for News and Civic Dialogue at WHYY, will moderate the panel discussion. She is also a former staff photojournalist at the Philadelphia Daily News and Inquirer.

Partner

I am honored to share this exhibition with Joseph V. Labolito. Visit: labolito.com

About the exhibition

In this exhibit, we explore the images of two photographers, Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, as they traveled around Philadelphia. Both captured unique human experiences, whether it was Labolito documenting neighborhood life or MacMillan following protestors marching through the streets. The contrast of the two photographers’ work as they moved about the city can be clearly seen in their photographs. While Labolito’s photographs in black and white are purposefully framed and occasionally posed, MacMillan’s color photographs were captured quickly and candidly in a way only a news photographer can. Both were trying to capture a fleeting moment in the city.

By creating a mixed gallery of their work, the viewer is surrounded by the city through their eyes. Combining images from these two collections, both recently donated to the Special Collections Research Center, we aim to demonstrate how everyone has a different perspective of the city they live in, and how two completely opposite experiences could happen right around the corner from one another. The viewer moves through the exhibit as an experience, surrounded by images of the city they may or may not remember, as the city is ever evolving.

Exhibit production by Brenda Galloway-Wright and Ann Mosher, Special Collections Research Center

Location

Charles Library at Temple University
1st Floor Exhibit Space
1900 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Hours | Parking and Transportation

About me

My usual home page will return after the exhibition but until then I will post any new photos here: Course of Life

Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

Women’s March

Drummers Lead Women’s March
Benjamin Franklin Parkway
2017
Jim MacMillan

This was one of the first events where I used a new approach of raising my little digital Canon pocket camera over my head with a selfie stick and and then zooming, framing and firing the shutter with my iPhone.

News photographers will climb almost anything to get a little altitude over a crowd, such as a newspaper box or a fire hydrant, but you don’t always find them right where you need them and I was really pleased with myself when I figured this out.

I wasn’t yet familiar with the Batala Philly drummers, who you see at the front, but I learned a little more about them after I spotted the another local group last year in Athens, as you can find on my bio page.

From the exhibition:

Portraits of Philadelphia: Photographs by Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, 1981-2023

On exhibit through March 31, 2024 | more info
Talk and reception: December 8, 2023 | free tickets

Update: Sarah Glover, Vice President for News and Civic Dialogue at WHYY, will moderate the panel discussion. She is also a former staff photojournalist at the Philadelphia Daily News and Inquirer.

Partner

I am honored to share this exhibition with Joseph V. Labolito. Visit: labolito.com

About the exhibition

In this exhibit, we explore the images of two photographers, Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, as they traveled around Philadelphia. Both captured unique human experiences, whether it was Labolito documenting neighborhood life or MacMillan following protestors marching through the streets. The contrast of the two photographers’ work as they moved about the city can be clearly seen in their photographs. While Labolito’s photographs in black and white are purposefully framed and occasionally posed, MacMillan’s color photographs were captured quickly and candidly in a way only a news photographer can. Both were trying to capture a fleeting moment in the city.

By creating a mixed gallery of their work, the viewer is surrounded by the city through their eyes. Combining images from these two collections, both recently donated to the Special Collections Research Center, we aim to demonstrate how everyone has a different perspective of the city they live in, and how two completely opposite experiences could happen right around the corner from one another. The viewer moves through the exhibit as an experience, surrounded by images of the city they may or may not remember, as the city is ever evolving.

Exhibit production by Brenda Galloway-Wright and Ann Mosher, Special Collections Research Center

Location

Charles Library at Temple University
1st Floor Exhibit Space
1900 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Hours | Parking and Transportation

About me

My usual home page will return after the exhibition but until then I will post any new photos here: Course of Life

Categories
Photographs from the Exhibition

Peace March

Antiwar Demonstrators March Toward City Hall
North Broad Street
Circa 2003
Jim MacMillan

I don’t exactly remember this march but I do remember covering numerous antiwar marches in Philadelphia during the days leading up to the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. I usually resisted filing pictures of people holding signs, partly because word editors always liked them so much, but I made an exception this time for some reason. I like that I can see part of the white facade of the old Daily News building in the background.

This photograph was captured with a digital camera, probably a Nikon D1H and and 80-200 Nikon zoom lens, though I usually would have cropped it form there to clean up the edges and straighten the horizon. I found this metadata attached to the file: Several groups totaling about 1,000 high school and college student peace protesters marched through Center City Wednesday. Date: 3/5/03, Time: 4:54:12 PM, Shutter: 1/640, f:4.0, ISO:500, lens:80.

From the exhibition:

Portraits of Philadelphia: Photographs by Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, 1981-2023

On exhibit through March 31, 2024 | more info
Talk and reception: December 8, 2023 | free tickets

Partner

I am honored to share this exhibition with Joseph V. Labolito. Visit: labolito.com

About the exhibition

In this exhibit, we explore the images of two photographers, Joseph V. Labolito and Jim MacMillan, as they traveled around Philadelphia. Both captured unique human experiences, whether it was Labolito documenting neighborhood life or MacMillan following protestors marching through the streets. The contrast of the two photographers’ work as they moved about the city can be clearly seen in their photographs. While Labolito’s photographs in black and white are purposefully framed and occasionally posed, MacMillan’s color photographs were captured quickly and candidly in a way only a news photographer can. Both were trying to capture a fleeting moment in the city.

By creating a mixed gallery of their work, the viewer is surrounded by the city through their eyes. Combining images from these two collections, both recently donated to the Special Collections Research Center, we aim to demonstrate how everyone has a different perspective of the city they live in, and how two completely opposite experiences could happen right around the corner from one another. The viewer moves through the exhibit as an experience, surrounded by images of the city they may or may not remember, as the city is ever evolving.

Exhibit production by Brenda Galloway-Wright and Ann Mosher, Special Collections Research Center

Location

Charles Library at Temple University
1st Floor Exhibit Space
1900 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Hours | Parking and Transportation

About me

My usual home page will return after the exhibition but until then I will post any new photos here: Course of Life